HARTWOOD BADGE

HARTWOOD BADGE

HARTWOOD HOSPITAL

1895 - 1995

A CELEBRATION OF 100 YEARS

VINE RULE

(Taken from the booklet issued during the centenary year )

HARTWOOD ASYLUM

Far o'er the fields, the moor, the wood,

and burns that sometimes rise in flood,

from out the haze of distant gloom,

the twin towers of Hartwood loom.

 

Retreat or prison, gaol or home,

for those who ceaselessly do come,

to live a second childhood - where

there is a refuge for them - there.

 

Ah! folks who stay in "hapless town",

whose days are dim and clouded down,

at least you're warm and dry, and fed,

with firmness, care, and patience led.

 

May times bring other, brighter days,

some rays of hope, shine through the haze,

and coming years relieve the strain,

of troubles that affect the brain.

 

Succeeding generations' day,

wear out the weaklings from the fray,

bring forth a stronger, abler race,

with wisdom for restraint and grace.

 

With less turmoil, and of strife,

"ring in the nobler modes of life

with sweeter manners, purer laws",

and strength to help the afflicted's cause.

CALDER-NETHAN (CIRCA 1922)

William Grossart's "Historic Notices and History of the Parish of Shotts" published in 1880, records the name Hartwood as first occurring about the 13th Century when it is referred to in the records as "part of the Barony of Murdostoun".

HARTWOOD HOSPITAL

The Hospital which was known as Lanark District Asylum was opened on Tuesday 14th May 1895. It appears that from the beginning the name Hartwood Asylum was preferred. The present name HARTWOOD HOSPITAL was assumed at a later point in time reflecting the changing attitudes of a more enlightened society towards mental illness. When it opened to receive patients the Hospital had 3 male wards and 3 female wards with a total capacity for five hundred patients. As we mark the Hospital's Centenary, of the original six wards only three remain, they stand empty and silent following the recent transfer of patients to the Hill Hospital at Hartwoodhill. The last few remaining patients in the last remaining ward may soon follow, and patient services within Hartwood Hospital are likely to end in its centenary year. The other three original wards have already disappeared off the face of the landscape as a consequence of service rationalisation and the development of care in the community. The other original buildings, which principally constitute the administrative section, also survive but their future is uncertain.

HARTWOOD TOWERSTHE TWIN TOWERS

Today the twin towers; landmarks visible for miles around, proudly remain to bear testament to one hundred years of service. From the top of the east tower; more commonly known as the Clock Tower, it is possible to look out over much of the community that the Hospital has served. There could be no better place to pause and reflect on the early years of this institution called Hartwood Hospital.


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